Endorsements/Teacher/General Education

Requirements for Teaching Endorsements

Please note: In addition to the required number of content semester hours of credit for each endorsement area, it is possible that you will have to complete elements of the professional education core as you seek to add endorsements. Among those elements that you might need to complete are the following:

Teachers licensed in Iowa may use this form to request a formal endorsement analysis for the state minimum requirements.

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Athletic Coach

112 Agriculture. 5-12. Completion of 24 semester credit hours in agriculture and agriculture education to include:
a. Foundations of vocational and career education.
b. Planning and implementing courses and curriculum.
c. Methods and techniques of instruction to include evaluation of programs and students.
d. Coordination of cooperative education programs.
e. Coursework in each of the following areas and at least three semester credit hours in five of the following areas:
(1) Agribusiness systems.
(2) Power, structural, and technical systems.
(3) Plant systems.
(4) Animal systems.
(5) Natural resources systems.
(6) Environmental service systems.
(7) Food products and processing systems.

Checklist

181 American Sign Language. 5-12. Completion of 18 semester hours of coursework in American Sign Language to include Second language acquisition, sociology of the deaf community, linguistic structure of American Sign Language, language teaching methodology specific to American Sign Language, teaching the culture of deaf people, assessment of students in an American Sign Language program.
In addition, the teacher must be the holder of (or be eligible for) one other teaching endorsement.
Checklist

113/114 Art. K-8 or 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in art to include course work in art history, studio art, and two and three dimensional art.
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1171--- Business--All. 5-12.
Completion of 30 semester hours in business to include

6 semester hours in accounting,
3 semester hours in business law to include contract law,
3 semester hours in computer and technical applications in business,
6 semester hours in marketing to include consumer studies,
3 semester hours in management,
6 semester hours in economics, and
3 semester hours in business communications to include formatting, language usage, and oral presentation.
Coursework in entrepreneurship and in financial literacy which may be a part of, or in addition to, the coursework listed above.
    Checklist

 

978 ---Content Specialist K-12
(1) Hold a master’s degree in the content area or complete 30 semester hours of college course work in the content area.

(2) Complete 15 semester hours of credit in professional development in three or more of the following areas:
1. Using research-based content teaching strategies;
2. Integrating appropriate technology into the learning experiences for the specific content;
3. Engaging the learner in the content through knowledge of learner needs and interests;
4. Using reflective thinking to solve problems in the content area;
5. Making data-driven decisions in the content area;
6. Utilizing project-based learning in the content area;
7. Developing critical thinking skills in the content area;
8. Forming partnerships to collaborate with content experts within the community;
9. Relating content with other content areas;
10. Facilitating content learning in large and small teams;
11. Implementing response to intervention (RTI) to close achievement gaps in the content area.

(3) Complete an internship, externship, or professional experience for a minimum of 90 contact hours in the content area.
Checklist

118 --- Driver and safety education. 5-12. Completion of 9 semester hours in driver and safety education to include coursework in accident prevention (that includes drug and alcohol abuse); vehicle safety,; and behind-the-wheel driving.
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119 --- English/language arts.

a. K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in English and language arts to include course work in oral communication, written communication, language development, reading, children's literature, creative drama or oral interpretation of literature, and American literature.
Checklist

120 --- English/language arts.

b. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in English to include course work in oral communication, written communication, language development, reading, American literature, English literature and adolescent literature.
Checklist

1201 --- English/language arts - All.

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b. 5-12 Completion of 40 semester hours in language arts to include coursework in the following areas:

a. Written communication.

(1) Develops a wide range of strategies and appropriately uses writing process elements (e.g., brainstorming, free-writing, first draft, group response, continued drafting, editing, and self-reflection) to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
(2) Develops knowledge of language structure (e.g., grammar), language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
b. Oral communication.
(1) Understands oral language, listening, and nonverbal communication skills; knows how to analyze communication interactions; and applies related knowledge and skills to teach students to become competent communicators in varied contexts.
(2) Understands the communication process and related theories, knows the purpose and function of communication and understands how to apply this knowledge to teach students to make appropriate and effective choices as senders and receivers of messages in varied contexts.
c. Language development.
(1) Understands inclusive and appropriate language, patterns and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions and social roles.
(2) Develops strategies to improve competency in the English language arts and understanding of content across the curriculum for students whose first language is not English.
d. Young adult literature, American literature, and world literature.
(1) Reads, comprehends, and analyzes a wide range of texts to build an understanding of self as well as the cultures of the United States and the world in order to acquire new information, to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace, and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, graphic novels, classic and contemporary works, young adult literature, and nonprint texts.
(2) Reads a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
(3) Applies a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. Draws on prior experience, interactions with other readers and writers, knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, word identification strategies, and an understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
(4) Participates as a knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical member of a variety of literacy communities.
e. Creative voice.
(1) Understands the art of oral interpretation and how to provide opportunities for students to develop and apply oral interpretation skills in individual and group performances for a variety of audiences, purposes and occasions.
(2) Understands the basic skills of theatre production including acting, stage movement, and basic stage design. f. Argumentation/debate.
(1) Understands concepts and principles of classical and contemporary rhetoric and is able to plan, prepare, organize, deliver and evaluate speeches and presentations.
(2) Understands argumentation and debate and how to provide students with opportunities to apply skills and strategies for argumentation and debate in a variety of formats and contexts.
g. Journalism.
(1) Understands ethical standards and major legal issues including First Amendment rights and responsibilities relevant to varied communication content. Utilizes strategies to teach students about the importance of freedom of speech in a democratic society and the rights and responsibilities of communicators.
(2) Understands the writing process as it relates to journalism (e.g., brainstorming, questioning, reporting, gathering and synthesizing information, writing, editing, and evaluating the final media product).
(3) Understands a variety of forms of journalistic writing (e.g., news, sports, features, opinion, Web-based) and the appropriate styles (e.g., Associated Press, multiple sources with attribution, punctuation) and additional forms unique to journalism (e.g., headlines, cutlines, and/or visual presentations).
h. Mass media production.
(1) Understands the role of the media in a democracy and the importance of preserving that role. IAC 7/29/09 Educational Examiners[282] Ch 13, p.15
(2) Understands how to interpret and analyze various types of mass media messages in order for students to become critical consumers.
(3) Develops the technological skills needed to package media products effectively using various forms of journalistic design with a range of visual and auditory methods.
i. Reading strategies (if not completed as part of the professional education core requirements).
(1) Uses a variety of skills and strategies to comprehend and interpret complex fiction, nonfiction and informational text.
(2) Reads for a variety of purposes and across content areas.

121 --- Foreign language. K-8 and 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in each foreign language.
Checklist

137/138 --- Health. K-8 and 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in health to include course work in public or community health, personal wellness, substance abuse, family life education, mental/emotional health, and human nutrition. A current certificate of CPR training is required in addition to the coursework requirements. For holders of the family and consumer science or physical education endorsements: 18 semester hours to include the same course work and requirements as listed above.
Checklist

139 --- Family and Consumer Science--general. 5-12. Completion of 24 semester hours in family and consumer sciences to include coursework in lifespan development, parenting and child development education, family studies, consumer resource management, textiles or apparel design and merchandising, housing, foods and nutrition, and foundations of career and technical education as related to family and consumer sciences.
Checklist

140 --- Industrial technology. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in industrial technology to include course work in manufacturing, construction, energy and power, graphic communications, and transportation. The course work is to include at least six semester hours in three different areas.
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141 --- Journalism. 5-12. Completion of fifteen semester hours in journalism to include course work in writing, editing, production, and visual communications.
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142 --- Mathematics K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in mathematics to include course work in algebra, geometry, number theory, measurement, computer programming, and probability and statistics.
Checklist

1421 --- 5-8 Algebra for High School Credit. For the 5-8 Algebra for High School Credit endorsement, hold either the K-8 mathematics or middle school mathematics endorsement and complete a college algebra or linear algebra class. This endorsement allows the holder to teach algebra to grades 5-8 for high school credit.
Checklist

143 --- Mathematics 5-12.

a. Completion of 24 semester hours in mathematics to include a linear algebra or an abstract (modern) algebra course, a geometry course, a two course sequence in calculus, a computer programming course, a probability and statistics course, and coursework in discrete mathematics.

b. For holders of the Physics 5-12 or All Science 9-12 endorsements: Completion of 17 semester hours in mathematics to include a geometry course, a two course sequence in calculus, a probability and statistics course, and coursework in discrete mathematics.


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144 --- Music K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in music to include course work in music theory (at least two courses), music history, and applied music, and a methods course in each of the following: instrumental, choral, and general music.
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145 --- Music 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in music to include course work in music theory (at least two courses), music history (at least two courses), applied music, and conducting, and a methods course in each of the following: instrumental, choral, and general music.
Checklist

182 --- Teacher--Middle School

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach in the two concentration areas in which the specific requirements have been completed as well as in other subject areas in grades five through eight which are not the core content areas. The holder is not authorized to teach art, industrial arts, music, reading, physical education and special education.

b. Program requirements.

(1) Be the holder of a currently valid Iowa teacher’s license with either the general elementary endorsement or one of the subject matter secondary level endorsements.
(2) A minimum of nine semester hours of required coursework in the following:
1. Coursework in the growth and development of the middle school age child, specifically addressing the social, emotional, physical and cognitive characteristics and needs of middle school age children in addition to related studies completed as part of the professional education core.
2. Coursework in middle school design, curriculum, instruction, and assessment including, but not limited to, interdisciplinary instruction, teaming, and differentiated instruction in addition to related studies completed as part of the professional education core.
3. Coursework to prepare middle school teachers in literacy (reading, writing, listening and speaking) strategies for students in grades five through eight and in methods to include these strategies throughout the curriculum.
4. Thirty hours of middle school field experiences included in the coursework requirements
c. Concentration areas. To obtain this endorsement, the applicant must complete the coursework requirements in two of the following content areas:
(1) Social studies concentration. The social studies concentration requires 12 semester hours of coursework in social studies to include coursework in United States history, world history, government and geography.
(2) Mathematics concentration. The mathematics concentration requires 12 semester hours in mathematics to include coursework in algebra.
(3) Science concentration. The science concentration requires 12 semester hours in science to include coursework in life science, earth science, and physical science.
(4) Language arts concentration. The language arts concentration requires 12 semester hours in language arts to include coursework in composition, language usage, speech, young adult literature, and literature across cultures.

Checklist

146 --- Physical education K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in physical education to include course work in human anatomy, human physiology, movement education, adaptive physical education, personal wellness, human growth and development of children related to physical education, and first aid and emergency care. A current certificate of CPR training is required in addition to the coursework requirements.
Checklist

147 --- Physical education 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in physical education to include course work in human anatomy, kinesiology, human physiology, human growth and development related to maturational and motor learning, adaptive physical education, curriculum, assessment, and administration of physical education, personal wellness, and first aid and emergency care. A current certificate of CPR training is required in addition to the coursework requirements.
Checklist

148 & 149 --- Reading K-8 & 5-12.
K-8 requirements effective September 1, 2007.
Checklist
Completion of 24 semester hours in reading to include all of the following requirements:

 

(1) Foundations of reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the psychological, sociocultural, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.

2. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of a range of research pertaining to reading, writing, and learning, including scientifically based reading research, and knowledge of histories of reading. The range of research encompasses research traditions from the fields of the social sciences and other paradigms appropriate for informing practice.

3. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the major components of reading, such as phonemic awareness, word identification, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension, and effectively integrates curricular standards with student interests, motivation, and background knowledge.

(2) Reading in the content areas. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of text structure and the dimensions of content area vocabulary and comprehension, including literal, interpretive, critical, and evaluative.

2. The practitioner provides content area instruction in reading and writing that effectively uses a variety of research-based strategies and practices.

(3) Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner works with licensed professionals who observe, evaluate, and provide feedback on the practitioner’s knowledge, dispositions, and performance of the teaching of reading and writing.

2. The practitioner effectively uses reading and writing strategies, materials, and assessments based upon appropriate reading and writing research and works with colleagues and families in the support of children’s reading and writing development.

(4) Language development. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of language development and acquisition of reading skills (birth through sixth grade), and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity to provide effective instruction in reading and writing.

(5) Oral communication. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner has knowledge of the unique needs and backgrounds of students with language differences and delays.

2. The practitioner uses effective strategies for facilitating the learning of Standard English by all learners.

(6) Written communication. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of reading-writing-speaking connections; the writing process; the stages of spelling development; the different types of writing, such as narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational and descriptive; and the connections between oral and written language development to effectively teach writing as communication.

(7) Reading assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner uses knowledge of a variety of instruments, procedures, and practices that range from individual to group and from formal to informal to alternative for the identification of students’ reading proficiencies and needs, for planning and revising instruction for all students, and for communicating the results of ongoing assessments to all stakeholders.

2. The practitioner demonstrates awareness of policies and procedures related to special programs, including Title I.

(8) Children’s nonfiction and fiction. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of children’s literature for:

 

1. Modeling the reading and writing of varied genres, including fiction and nonfiction; technology- and media-based information; and nonprint materials;

2. Motivating through the use of texts at multiple levels, representing broad interests, and reflecting varied cultures, linguistic backgrounds, and perspectives; and

3. Matching text complexities to the proficiencies and needs of readers.

(9) Reading instructional strategies. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of a range of research-based strategies and instructional technology for designing and delivering effective instruction across the curriculum, for grouping students, and for selecting materials appropriate for learners at various stages of reading and writing development and from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
Checklist
5-12 Reading Requirements
    Checklist Completion of 24 semester hours in reading to include all of the following requirements:

 

(1) Foundations of reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the psychological, sociocultural, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.

2. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of a range of research pertaining to reading, writing, and learning, including scientifically based reading research, and knowledge of histories of reading. The range of research encompasses research traditions from the fields of the social sciences and other paradigms appropriate for informing practice.

3. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the major components of reading such as phonemic awareness, word identification, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension, and integrates curricular standards with student interests, motivation, and background knowledge.

(2) Reading in the content areas. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of text structure and the dimensions of content area vocabulary and comprehension, including literal, interpretive, critical, and evaluative.

2. The practitioner provides content area instruction in reading and writing that effectively uses a variety of research-based strategies and practices.

(3) Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner works with licensed professionals who observe, evaluate, and provide feedback on the practitioner’s knowledge, dispositions, and performance of the teaching of reading and writing.

2. The practitioner effectively uses reading and writing strategies, materials, and assessments based upon appropriate reading and writing research, and works with colleagues and families in the support of students’ reading and writing development.

(4) Language development. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of the relationship of language acquisition and language development with the acquisition and development of reading skills, and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity to provide effective instruction in reading and writing.

(5) Oral communication. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the unique needs and backgrounds of students with language differences and uses effective strategies for facilitating the learning of Standard English by all learners.

(6) Written communication. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of reading-writing-speaking connections to teach the skills and processes necessary for writing narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive texts, including text structures and mechanics such as grammar, usage, and spelling.

(7) Reading assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. This requirement includes the following competencies:

 

1. The practitioner uses knowledge of a variety of instruments, procedures, and practices that range from individual to group and from formal to informal to alternative for the identification of students’ reading proficiencies and needs, for planning and revising instruction for all students, and for communicating the results of ongoing assessments to all stakeholders.

2. The practitioner also demonstrates awareness of policies and procedures related to special programs.

(8) Adolescent or young adult nonfiction and fiction. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of adolescent or young adult literature for:

 

1. Modeling the reading and writing of varied genres, including fiction and nonfiction; technologyand media-based information; and nonprint materials;

2. Motivating through the use of texts at multiple levels, representing broad interests, and reflecting varied cultures, linguistic backgrounds and perspectives; and

3. Matching text complexities to the proficiencies and needs of readers.

(9) Reading instructional strategies. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of a range of research-based strategies and instructional technology for designing and delivering instruction across the curriculum, for grouping students, and for selecting materials appropriate for learners at various stages of reading and writing development and from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
Checklist

 

176 --- Reading specialist. K-12.

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a reading specialist in kindergarten and grades one through twelve.

b. Program requirements.

(1) Degree--master's.
(2) Content. Completion of a sequence of courses and experiences which may have been a part of, or in addition to, the degree requirements. This sequence is to be a t least twenty-seven semester hours to include the following:

  1. Educational psychology/human growth and development.
  2. Educational measurement and evaluation.
  3. Foundations of reading.
  4. Diagnosis of reading problems.
  5. Remedial reading.
  6. Psychology of reading.
  7. Language learning and reading disabilities.
  8. Practicum in reading.
  9. Administration and supervision of reading programs at the elementary and secondary levels.

Note: The applicant must have met the requirements for the standard license and a teaching endorsement, and present evidence of at least one year of experience which included the teaching of reading as a significant part of the responsibility.
Checklist

150 --- Science--basic. K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in science to include course work in biological and physical sciences.  12 hours in physical sciences, 6 hours in biology, and 6 hours in earth/space sciences.
Checklist

1.  Understand the nature of scientific inquiry, its central role in science, and how to use the skills and processes of scientific inquiry.

2.  Understand the fundamental facts and concepts in major science disciplines.

3.  Be able to make conceptual connections within and across science disciplines, as well as to mathematics, technology, and other school subjects. <

4.  Be able to use scientific understanding when dealing with personal and societal issues.
Checklist

151 --- Science - Biological. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in biological science or thirty semester hours in the broad area of science to include fifteen semester hours in biological science.
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152 --- Science - Chemistry. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in chemistry or thirty semester hours in the broad area of science to include fifteen semester hours in chemistry.
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153 --- Science - Earth science. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in earth science or thirty semester hours in the broad area of science to include fifteen semester hours in earth science.
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1541 --- Science - Basic Science. 5-12. Complete 24 semester hours of credit in science which includes the following:

Six semester hours of credit in earth and space science which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
Understand and apply knowledge of energy in the earth system
Understand and apply knowledge of geochemical cycles

Six semester hours of credit in life science/biological science which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
Understand and apply knowledge of the cell
Understand and apply knowledge of the molecular basis of heredity
Understand and apply knowledge of the interdependence of organisms
Understand and apply knowledge of matter, energy, and organization in living systems
Understand and apply knowledge of the behavior of organisms

Six semester hours of credit in physics/physical science which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
Understand and apply knowledge of the structure of atoms
Understand and apply knowledge of the structure and properties of matter
Understand and apply knowledge of motions and forces
Understands and applies knowledge of interactions of energy and matter

Six semester hours of credit in chemistry which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
Understand and apply knowledge of chemical reactions
Design and conduct scientific investigations
Checklist

156 --- Science - Physics. 5-12.

a. Completion of 24 semester hours in physics or 30 semester hours in the broad area of science to include 15 semester hours in physics.

b. For holders of the Mathematics 5-12 endorsement:

  • Completion of 12 credits of physics to include coursework in mechanics, electricity and magnetism.
  • A methods class that includes inquiry based instruction, resource management, and lab safety.

c. For holders of the Chemistry 5-12 endorsement: Completion of 12 credits of physics to include coursework in mechanics, electricity, and magnetism.


    Checklist

185 --- Science. All Science II. 9-12.

This endorsement authorizes the holder to teach all high school science courses.
Complete 36 semester hours of credit in science which includes the following:

  • 9 semester hours of credit in earth and space science which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
    Understand and apply knowledge of energy in the earth system
    Understand and apply knowledge of geochemical cycles
    Understand and apply knowledge of the origin and evolution of the earth system
    Understand and apply knowledge of the origin and evolution of the universe
  • 9 semester hours of credit in life science/biological science which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
    Understand and apply knowledge of the cell
    Understand and apply knowledge of the molecular basis of heredity
    Understand and apply knowledge of the interdependence of organisms
    Understand and apply knowledge of matter, energy, and organization in living systems
    Understand and apply knowledge of the behavior of organisms
    Understand and apply knowledge of biological evolution
  • 9 semester hours of credit in physics/physical science which includes the following essential concepts and skills
    Understand and apply knowledge of the structure of atoms
    Understand and apply knowledge of the structure and properties of matter
    Understand and apply knowledge of motions and forces
    Understands and applies knowledge of interactions of energy and matter
    Understands and applies knowledge of conservation of energy and increase in disorder
  • 9 semester hours of credit in chemistry which includes the following essential concepts and skills:
    Understand and apply knowledge of chemical reactions
    Design and conduct scientific investigations

Checklist

Social Sciences.

157 --- Social Sciences - American government. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in American government or thirty semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in American government.
Checklist

158 --- Social Sciences - American history. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in American history or thirty semester hours in the broad area of the social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in American history.
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159 --- Social Sciences - Anthropology. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in anthropology or thirty semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in anthropology.
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160 --- Social Sciences - Economics. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in economics or thirty semester hours in the broad area of the social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in economics, or thirty semester hours in the broad area of business to include fifteen semester hours in economics.
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161 --- Social Sciences - Geography. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in geography or thirty semester hours in the broad area of the social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in geography.
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162 --- Social Sciences - History. K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in history to include at least nine semester hours in American history and nine semester hours in world history.
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163 --- Social Sciences - Psychology. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in psychology or thirty semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in psychology.
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164 --- Social Sciences - Social studies. K-8. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in social studies, to include course work from at least three of these areas: history, sociology, economics, American government, psychology, and geography.
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165 --- Social Sciences - Sociology. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in sociology or thirty semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in sociology.
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166 --- Social Sciences - World history. 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in world history or thirty semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include fifteen semester hours in world history.
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186 --- Social Sciences - All Social Sciences.  5-12 Completion of 51 semester hours in the social sciences to include:

  9 semester hours in World History
  9 semester hours in American History
  9 semester hours in Government
  6 semester hours in Sociology
  6 semester hours in psychology other than educational psychology
  6 semester hours in geography, and 
  6 semester hours in economics     Checklist

167 Speech communication/theatre - K-8. Completion of twenty semester hours in speech communication/theatre to include course work in speech communication, creative drama or theatre, and oral interpretation.
Checklist

168 Speech communication/theatre - 5-12. Completion of twenty-four semester hours in speech communication/theatre to include course work in speech communication, oral interpretation, creative drama or theatre, argumentation and debate, and mass media communication.
Checklist

101 Athletic coach. K-12.
Checklist

a. The holder of this endorsement may serve as a head coach or an assistant coach in kindergarten and grades one through twelve.

b. Program requirements.

(1) One semester hour college or university course in the structure and function of the human body in relation to physical activity.
(2) One semester hour college or university course in human growth and development of children and youth as related to physical activity.
(3) Two semester hour college or university course in athletic conditioning, care and prevention of injuries and first aid as related to physical activity.
(4) One semester hour college or university course in the theory of coaching interscholastic athletics.

Note: An applicant for the coaching endorsement must hold a teacher's license with one of the teaching endorsements.
Checklist

102 --- Teacher--elementary classroom.

Current requirements are found directly below this exhibit.  Effective September 1, 2015, the following requirements apply to persons who wish to teach in the elementary classroom:

  1. Authorization.  The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach in kindergarten and grades one through six.
  2. Program requirements.

(1) Degree—baccalaureate, and
(2) Completion of an approved human relations component, and
(3) Completion of the professional education core. See subrules 13.18(3) and 13.18(4).
(4) Highly qualified teacher (HQT) status. Applicants from non-Iowa institutions who have completed the requirements for this endorsement must verify their HQT status. The board shall determine the test and the minimum passing score for HQT status. Verification must be provided through one of the following:

  1. Written verification from the department of education in the state in which the applicant completed the elementary teacher preparation program that the applicant has achieved HQT status in that state; or
  2. Written verification from the department of education in the state where the applicant is currently teaching that the applicant has achieved HQT status in that state; or
  3. Submission of the official test score report indicating the applicant has met the qualifying score for licensure in the state in which the applicant completed the elementary teacher preparation program; or
  4. Verification that the applicant has obtained the qualifying score set by the Iowa board of educational examiners if the applicant has not been teaching within the last five years and completion of a teacher preparation program prior to enactment in June 2006 of the federal highly qualified teacher provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This option may also be utilized by applicants from outside the United States.
  5. For applicants who have completed the requirements for one of the Iowa elementary endorsements, verification of HQT status by meeting the minimum score set by the Iowa board of educational examiners if the applicant has not been teaching within the last five years and completion of a teacher preparation program prior to enactment in June 2006 of the federal highly qualified teacher provisions of IDEA. This option may also be utilized by applicants who have been teaching outside the United States.

c.  Content.
(1) Child growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical and mental characteristics of elementary age children, unless completed as part of the professional education core. See subrule 13.18(4).
(2) At least 9 semester hours in literacy which must include:

  1. Content:
    1. Children’s literature;
    2. Oral and written communication skills for the twenty-first century.
  2. Methods:
    1. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation of student learning in literacy;
    2. Integration of the language arts (to include reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and listening);
    3. Integration of technology in teaching and student learning in literacy;
    4. Current best-practice, research-based approaches of literacy instruction;
    5. Classroom management as it applies to literacy methods;
    6. Pre-student teaching clinical experience in teaching literacy.

(3)  At least 9 semester hours in mathematics which must include:

  1. Content:
    1. Numbers and operations;
    2. Algebra/number patterns;
    3. Geometry;
    4. Measurement;
    5. Data analysis/probability.
  2. Methods:
    1. Assessment, diagnosis and evaluation of student learning in mathematics;
    2. Current best-practice, research-based instructional methods in mathematical processes (to include problem solving; reasoning; communication; the ability to recognize, make and apply connections; integration of manipulatives; the ability to construct and to apply multiple connected representations; and the application of content to real world experiences);
    3. Integration of technology in teaching and student learning in mathematics;
    4. Classroom management as it applies to mathematics methods;
    5. Pre-student teaching clinical experience in teaching mathematics.

(4) At least 9 semester hours in social sciences which must include:

  1. Content:
    1. History;
    2. Geography;
    3. Political science/civic literacy;
    4. Economics;
    5. Behavioral sciences.
  2. Methods:
    1. Current best-practice, research-based approaches to the teaching and learning of social sciences;
    2. Integration of technology in teaching and student learning in social sciences;
    3. Classroom management as it applies to social science methods.

(5) At least 9 semester hours in science which must include:

  1. Content:
    1. Physical science;
    2. Earth/space science;
    3. Life science.
  2. Methods:
    1. Current best-practice, research-based methods of inquiry-based teaching and learning of science;
    2. Integration of technology in teaching and student learning in science;
    3. Classroom management as it applies to science methods.

(6) At least 3 semester hours to include all of the following:

  1. Methods of teaching elementary physical education, health, and wellness;
  2. Methods of teaching visual arts for the elementary classroom;
  3. Methods of teaching performance arts for the elementary classroom.

(7) Pre-student teaching field experience in at least two different grade levels to include one primary and one intermediate placement.
(8) A field of specialization in a single discipline or a formal interdisciplinary program of at least 12 semester hours.

Current (pre-2015) requirements:

    Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach in kindergarten and grades one through six.

b. Program requirements.

(1) Degree--baccalaureate.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations component.
(3) Completion of the professional education core.
(4) Content:

  1. Child growth and development with emphasis on the emotional, physical and mental characteristics of elementary age children, unless completed as part of the professional education core.
  2. Methods and materials of teaching elementary language arts.
  3. Methods and materials of teaching elementary reading.
  4. Elementary curriculum (methods and materials).
  5. Methods and materials of teaching elementary mathematics.
  6. Methods and materials of teaching elementary science.
  7. Children's literature.
  8. Methods and materials of teaching elementary social studies.
  9. Methods and materials in two of the following areas:

-Methods and materials of teaching elementary health.
-Methods and materials of teaching elementary physical education.
-Methods and materials of teaching elementary art.
-Methods and materials of teaching elementary music.

10. Prestudent teaching field experience in at least two different grades.
11. A field of specialization in a single discipline or a formal interdisciplinary program of at least twelve semester hours.
Checklist

103 --- Teacher prekindergarten - kindergarten.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach at the prekindergarten - kindergarten level. 

b. Program requirements.

(1) Degree - baccalaureate.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations program.
(3) Completion of the professional education core.
(4) Content:

  1. Human growth and development: infancy and early childhood, unless completed as part of the professional education core.
  2. Curriculum development and methodology for young children.
  3. Child family school community relationships (community agencies).
  4. Guidance of young children three to six years of age.
  5. Organization of prekindergarten - kindergarten programs.
  6. Child and family nutrition.
  7. Language development and learning.
  8. Kindergarten: programs and curriculum development. 
  9. Graded practicum or student teaching at the Pre-K level  

106 --- Teacher prekindergarten through grade three.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach children from birth through grade three.

b. Program requirements.

(1) Degree--baccalaureate.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations program.
(3) Completion of the professional education core.
(4) Content:

  1. Child growth and development with emphasis on cognitive, language, physical, social, and emotional development, both typical and atypical, for infants and toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children (grades one through three), unless combined as part of the professional education core.
  2. Historical, philosophical, and social foundations of early childhood education.
  3. Developmentally appropriate curriculum with emphasis on integrated multicultural and nonsexist content including language, mathematics, science, social studies, health, safety, nutrition, visual and expressive arts, social skills, higherthinking skills, and developmentally appropriate methodology, including adaptations for individual needs, for infants and toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children.
  4. Characteristics of play and creativity, and their contributions to the cognitive, language, physical, social and emotional development and learning of infants and toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children.
  5. Classroom organization and individual interactions to create positive learning environments for infants and toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children based on child development theory emphasizing guidance techniques.
  6. Observation and application of developmentally appropriate assessments for infants and toddlers, preprimary, and primary school children recognizing, referring, and making adaptations for children who are at risk or who have exceptional educational needs and talents.
  7. Homeschoolcommunity relationships and interactions designed to promote and support parent, family and community involvement, and interagency collaboration.
  8. Family systems, cultural diversity, and factors which place families at risk.
  9. Child and family health and nutrition
  10. Advocacy, legislation, and public policy as they affect children and families
  11. Administration of child care programs to include staff and program development and supervision and evaluation of support staff. IAC 8/19/92, 7/16/97 
  12. Prestudent teaching field experience with three age levels in infant and toddler, preprimary, and primary programs, with no less than 100 clock hours, and in different settings, such as rural and urban, socioeconomic status, cultural diversity, program types, and program sponsorship. (5) Student teaching experiences with two different age levels, one before kindergarten and one from kindergarten through grade three.  

(5)  Student teaching experiences with two different age levels, one before kindergarten and one from kindergarten through grade three.
Checklist

107 ---Talented and gifted teacher-coordinator.
Checklist

The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a teacher or a coordinator of programs for the gifted and talented from the prekindergarten level through grade twelve. This authorization does not permit general classroom teaching at any level except that level or area for which the holder is eligible or holds the specific endorsement. Completion of 12 semester hours of coursework in the area of the gifted and talented to include the following:

 

  1. Psychology of the gifted.
    • Social needs
    • Emotional needs
  2. Programming for the gifted.
    • Prekindergarten – 12 identification
    • Differentiation strategies
    • Collaboration skills
    • Program goals and performance measures
    • Program evaluation
  3. Practicum experience in gifted programs.
Note: Teachers in specific subject areas will not be required to hold this endorsement if they teach gifted students in their respective endorsement areas.
    Checklist

104 --- English as a Second Language (ESL). K-12.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach English as a second language in kindergarten and grades one through twelve.
b. Program requirements.
(1) Degree baccalaureate.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations program.
(3) Completion of the professional education core.
(4) Content. Completion of 18 semester hours of coursework in English as a second language to include the following:
Knowledge of Pedagogy
Methods and curriculum
Bilingual and ESL methods
Literacy in native and second language
Methods for subject matter content
Adaptation and modification of curriculum
Assessment to include language proficiency and academic content
Knowledge of Linguistics
Linguistics to include psycholinguistics/sociolinguistics
Language acquisition/proficiency
Knowledge of first and second language acquisition
Knowledge of first and second language proficiency
Language to include structure/grammar of English
Knowledge of Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
History
Theory, models, research
Policy, legislation
Current issues with transient populations

Checklist

 

172 --- Elementary counselor.
    
Checklist
    Checklist for adding to existing secondary counseling

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a school guidance counselor in kindergarten and grades one through eight.
b. Program requirements.

(1) Master’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations component.
(3) Completion of an approved exceptional learner component.
c. Content. Completion of a sequence of courses and experiences which may have been a part of, or in addition to, the degree requirements to include the following:
(1) Nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels.
1. Develop strategies for facilitating development through the transition from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to young adult.
2. Apply knowledge of learning and personality development to assist students in developing their full potential.
(2) Social and cultural foundations.
1. Demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to the unique social, cultural, and economic circumstances of students and their racial/ethnic, gender, age, physical, and learning differences.
2. Demonstrate sensitivity to the nature and the functioning of the student within the family, school and community contexts.
3. Demonstrate the counseling and consultation skills needed to facilitate informed and appropriate action in response to the needs of students.
(3) Fostering of relationships.
1. Employ effective counseling and consultation skills with students, parents, colleagues, administrators, and others.
2. Communicate effectively with parents, colleagues, students and administrators.
3. Counsel students in the areas of personal, social, academic, and career development.
4. Assist families in helping their children address the personal, social, and emotional concerns and problems that may impede educational progress.
5. Implement developmentally appropriate counseling interventions with children and adolescents.
6. Demonstrate the ability to negotiate and move individuals and groups toward consensus or conflict resolution or both.
7. Refer students for specialized help when appropriate.
8. Value the well-being of the students as paramount in the counseling relationship.
(4) Group work.
1. Implement developmentally appropriate interventions involving group dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group work approaches.
2. Apply knowledge of group counseling in implementing appropriate group processes for elementary, middle school, and secondary students.
(5) Career development, education, and postsecondary planning.
1. Assist students in the assessment of their individual strengths, weaknesses, and differences, including those that relate to academic achievement and future plans.
2. Apply knowledge of career assessment and career choice programs.
3. Implement occupational and educational placement, follow-up and evaluation.
4. Develop a counseling network and provide resources for use by students in personalizing the exploration of postsecondary educational opportunities.
(6) Assessment and evaluation.
1. Demonstrate individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the proper administration and uses of standardized tests.
3. Apply knowledge of test administration, scoring, and measurement concerns.
4. Apply evaluation procedures for monitoring student achievement.
5. Apply assessment information in program design and program modifications to address students’ needs.
6. Apply knowledge of legal and ethical issues related to assessment and student records.
(7) Professional orientation.
1. Apply knowledge of history, roles, organizational structures, ethics, standards, and credentialing.
2. Maintain a high level of professional knowledge and skills.
3. Apply knowledge of professional and ethical standards to the practice of school counseling.
4. Articulate the counselor role to school personnel, parents, community, and students.
(8) School counseling skills.
1. Design, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive, developmental school guidance program.
2. Implement and evaluate specific strategies designed to meet program goals and objectives.
3. Consult and coordinate efforts with resource persons, specialists, businesses, and agencies outside the school to promote program objectives.
4. Provide information appropriate to the particular educational transition and assist students in understanding the relationship that their curricular experiences and academic achievements will have on subsequent educational opportunities.
5. Assist parents and families in order to provide a supportive environment in which students can become effective learners and achieve success in pursuit of appropriate educational goals.
6. Provide training, orientation, and consultation assistance to faculty, administrators, staff, and school officials to assist them in responding to the social, emotional, and educational development of all students.
7. Collaborate with teachers, administrators, and other educators in ensuring that appropriate educational experiences are provided that allow all students to achieve success.
8. Assist in the process of identifying and addressing the needs of the exceptional student.
9. Apply knowledge of legal and ethical issues related to child abuse and mandatory reporting.
10. Advocate for the educational needs of students and work to ensure that these needs are addressed at every level of the school experience.
11. Promote use of counseling and guidance activities and programs involving the total school community to provide a positive school climate.
(9) Classroom management.
1. Apply effective classroom management strategies as demonstrated in classroom guidance and large group guidance lessons.
2. Consult with teachers and parents about effective classroom management and behavior management strategies.
(10) Curriculum.
1. Write classroom lessons including objectives, learning activities, and discussion questions.
2. Utilize various methods of evaluating what students have learned in classroom lessons.
3. Demonstrate competency in conducting classroom and other large group activities, utilizing an effective lesson plan design, engaging students in the learning process, and employing ageappropriate classroom management strategies.
4. Design a classroom unit of developmentally appropriate learning experiences.
5. Demonstrate knowledge in writing standards and benchmarks for curriculum.
(11) Learning theory.
1. Identify and consult with teachers about how to create a positive learning environment utilizing such factors as effective classroom management strategies, building a sense of community in the classroom, and cooperative learning experiences.
2. Identify and consult with teachers regarding teaching strategies designed to motivate students using small group learning activities, experiential learning activities, student mentoring programs, and shared decision-making opportunities.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of child and adolescent development and identify developmentally appropriate teaching and learning strategies.
(12) Teaching and counseling practicum.
The school counselor demonstrates competency in conducting classroom sessions with elementary and middle school students. The practicum consisting of a minimum of 500 contact hours provides opportunities for the prospective counselor, under the supervision of a licensed professional school counselor, to engage in a variety of activities in which a regularly employed school counselor would be expected to participate including, but not limited to, individual counseling, group counseling, developmental classroom guidance, and consultation.
Checklist
Checklist for adding to existing secondary counseling

173 --- Secondary counselor.
Checklist
Checklist for adding to existing secondary counseling

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a school guidance counselor in grades five through twelve.
b. Program requirements.

(1) Master’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
(2) Completion of an approved human relations component.
(3) Completion of an approved exceptional learner component.
c. Content. Completion of a sequence of courses and experiences which may have been a part of, or in addition to, the degree requirements to include the following:
(1) Nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels.
1. Develop strategies for facilitating development through the transition from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to young adult.
2. Apply knowledge of learning and personality development to assist students in developing their full potential.
(2) Social and cultural foundations.
1. Demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to the unique social, cultural, and economic circumstances of students and their racial/ethnic, gender, age, physical, and learning differences.
2. Demonstrate sensitivity to the nature and the functioning of the student within the family, school and community contexts.
3. Demonstrate the counseling and consultation skills needed to facilitate informed and appropriate action in response to the needs of students.
(3) Fostering of relationships.
1. Employ effective counseling and consultation skills with students, parents, colleagues, administrators, and others.
2. Communicate effectively with parents, colleagues, students and administrators.
3. Counsel students in the areas of personal, social, academic, and career development.
4. Assist families in helping their children address the personal, social, and emotional concerns and problems that may impede educational progress.
5. Implement developmentally appropriate counseling interventions with children and adolescents.
6. Demonstrate the ability to negotiate and move individuals and groups toward consensus or conflict resolution or both.
7. Refer students for specialized help when appropriate.
8. Value the well-being of the students as paramount in the counseling relationship.
(4) Group work.
1. Implement developmentally appropriate interventions involving group dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group work approaches.
2. Apply knowledge of group counseling in implementing appropriate group processes for elementary, middle school, and secondary students.
(5) Career development, education, and postsecondary planning.
1. Assist students in the assessment of their individual strengths, weaknesses, and differences, including those that relate to academic achievement and future plans.
2. Apply knowledge of career assessment and career choice programs.
3. Implement occupational and educational placement, follow-up and evaluation.
4. Develop a counseling network and provide resources for use by students in personalizing the exploration of postsecondary educational opportunities.
(6) Assessment and evaluation.
1. Demonstrate individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the proper administration and uses of standardized tests.
3. Apply knowledge of test administration, scoring, and measurement concerns.
4. Apply evaluation procedures for monitoring student achievement.
5. Apply assessment information in program design and program modifications to address students’ needs.
6. Apply knowledge of legal and ethical issues related to assessment and student records.
(7) Professional orientation.
1. Apply knowledge of history, roles, organizational structures, ethics, standards, and credentialing.
2. Maintain a high level of professional knowledge and skills.
3. Apply knowledge of professional and ethical standards to the practice of school counseling.
4. Articulate the counselor role to school personnel, parents, community, and students.
(8) School counseling skills.
1. Design, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive, developmental school guidance program.
2. Implement and evaluate specific strategies designed to meet program goals and objectives.
3. Consult and coordinate efforts with resource persons, specialists, businesses, and agencies outside the school to promote program objectives.
4. Provide information appropriate to the particular educational transition and assist students in understanding the relationship that their curricular experiences and academic achievements will have on subsequent educational opportunities.
5. Assist parents and families in order to provide a supportive environment in which students can become effective learners and achieve success in pursuit of appropriate educational goals.
6. Provide training, orientation, and consultation assistance to faculty, administrators, staff, and school officials to assist them in responding to the social, emotional, and educational development of all students.
7. Collaborate with teachers, administrators, and other educators in ensuring that appropriate educational experiences are provided that allow all students to achieve success.
8. Assist in the process of identifying and addressing the needs of the exceptional student.
9. Apply knowledge of legal and ethical issues related to child abuse and mandatory reporting.
10. Advocate for the educational needs of students and work to ensure that these needs are addressed at every level of the school experience.
11. Promote use of counseling and guidance activities and programs involving the total school community to provide a positive school climate.
(9) Classroom management.
1. Apply effective classroom management strategies as demonstrated in classroom guidance and large group guidance lessons.
2. Consult with teachers and parents about effective classroom management and behavior management strategies.
(10) Curriculum.
1. Write classroom lessons including objectives, learning activities, and discussion questions.
2. Utilize various methods of evaluating what students have learned in classroom lessons.
3. Demonstrate competency in conducting classroom and other large group activities, utilizing an effective lesson plan design, engaging students in the learning process, and employing ageappropriate classroom management strategies.
4. Design a classroom unit of developmentally appropriate learning experiences.
5. Demonstrate knowledge in writing standards and benchmarks for curriculum.
(11) Learning theory.
1. Identify and consult with teachers about how to create a positive learning environment utilizing such factors as effective classroom management strategies, building a sense of community in the classroom, and cooperative learning experiences.
2. Identify and consult with teachers regarding teaching strategies designed to motivate students using small group learning activities, experiential learning activities, student mentoring programs, and shared decision-making opportunities.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of child and adolescent development and identify developmentally appropriate teaching and learning strategies.
(12) Teaching and counseling practicum.
The school counselor demonstrates competency in conducting classroom sessions with middle and secondary school students. The practicum consisting of a minimum of 500 contact hours provides opportunities for the prospective counselor, under the supervision of a licensed professional school counselor, to engage in a variety of activities in which a regularly employed school counselor would be expected to participate including, but not limited to, individual counseling, group work, developmental classroom guidance and consultation.


Checklist
Checklist for adding to existing secondary counseling

108 --- Elementary school teacher librarian.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a teacher librarian in kindergarten and grades one through eight.
b. Program requirements.
1.  Degree--baccalaureate.
2.  Completion of an approved human relations program.
3.  Completion of the professional education core.
4.  Content. Completion of 24 semester hours in school library coursework to include the following:

(1) Literacy and reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners collaborate with other teachers to integrate developmentally appropriate literature in multiple formats to support literacy in children.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of resources and strategies to foster leisure reading and model personal enjoyment of reading among children, based on familiarity with selection tools and current trends in literature for children.

(2) Information and knowledge. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners teach multiple strategies to locate, analyze, evaluate, and ethically use information in the context of inquiry-based learning.
  • Practitioners advocate for flexible and open access to library resources, both physical and virtual.
  • Practitioners uphold and promote the legal and ethical codes of their profession, including privacy, confidentiality, freedom and equity of access to information.
  • Practitioners use skills and knowledge to assess reference sources, services, and tools in order to mediate between information needs and resources to assist learners in determining what they need.
  • Practitioners model and facilitate authentic learning with current and emerging digital tools for locating, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information resources to support research, learning, creating, and communicating in a digital society.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of creative and innovative uses of technologies to engage students and facilitate higher-level thinking.
  • Practitioners develop an articulated information literacy curriculum grounded in research related to the information search process.

(3) Program administration and leadership. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners evaluate and select print, nonprint, and digital resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop and manage a quality collection designed to meet the diverse curricular, personal, and professional needs of the educational community.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge necessary to organize the library collections according to current standard library cataloging and classification principles.
  • Practitioners develop policies and procedures to support ethical use of information, intellectual freedom, selection and reconsideration of library materials, and the privacy of users.
  • Practitioners develop strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program.

(4) Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners apply knowledge of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and cultural influences of learning at the elementary level.
  • Practitioners implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute to an active, inquiry-based approach to learning in a digital environment at the elementary level.
  • Practitioners understand the teacher librarian role in curriculum development and the school improvement process at the elementary level.
Practitioners collaborate to integrate information literacy and emerging technologies into content area curricula at the elementary level.
Checklist
 

109 ---Secondary school teacher librarian.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a teacher librarian in grades five through twelve.
b. Program requirements.
1.  Degree--baccalaureate.
2.  Completion of an approved human relations program.
3.  Completion of the professional education core.
4.  Content. Completion of 24 semester hours in school library coursework to include the following:

(1) Literacy and reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners collaborate with other teachers to integrate developmentally appropriate literature in multiple formats to support literacy in young adults.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of resources and strategies to foster leisure reading and model personal enjoyment of reading among young adults, based on familiarity with selection tools and current trends in literature for young adults.

(2) Information and knowledge. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners teach multiple strategies to locate, analyze, evaluate, and ethically use information in the context of inquiry-based learning.
  • Practitioners advocate for flexible and open access to library resources, both physical and virtual.
  • Practitioners uphold and promote the legal and ethical codes of their profession, including privacy, confidentiality, freedom and equity of access to information.
  • Practitioners use skills and knowledge to assess reference sources, services, and tools in order to mediate between information needs and resources to assist learners in determining what they need.
  • Practitioners model and facilitate authentic learning with current and emerging digital tools for locating, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information resources to support research, learning, creating, and communicating in a digital society.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of creative and innovative uses of technologies to engage students and facilitate higher-level thinking.
  • Practitioners develop an articulated information literacy curriculum grounded in research related to the information search process.

(3) Program administration and leadership. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners evaluate and select print, non-print, and digital resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop and manage a quality collection designed to meet the diverse curricular, personal, and professional needs of the educational community.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge necessary to organize the library collections according to current standard library cataloging and classification principles.
  • Practitioners develop policies and procedures to support ethical use of information, intellectual freedom, selection and reconsideration of library materials, and the privacy of users.
  • Practitioners develop strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program.

(4) Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners apply knowledge of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and cultural influences of learning at the secondary level.
  • Practitioners implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute to an active, inquiry-based approach to learning in a digital environment at the secondary level.
  • Practitioners understand the teacher librarian role in curriculum development and the school improvement process at the secondary level.
Practitioners collaborate to integrate information literacy and emerging technologies into content area curricula at the secondary level.

Checklist
 

174 ---School teacher librarian. K-12.
Checklist

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a teacher librarian in pre-kindergarten through grade twelve. The applicant must be the holder of or eligible for the initial, standard, or master teaching license.
b. Program requirements.
1.  Degree—Master’s.
2.  Content. Completion of thirty semester hours in school library coursework to include the following:

(1) Literacy and reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners collaborate with other teachers to integrate developmentally appropriate literature in multiple formats to support literacy for youth of all ages.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of resources and strategies to foster leisure reading and model personal enjoyment of reading, based on familiarity with selection tools and current trends in literature for youth of all ages.
  • Practitioners understand how to develop a collection of reading and informational materials in print and digital formats that supports the diverse developmental, cultural, social and linguistic needs of all learners and their communities.
  • Practitioners model and teach reading comprehension strategies to create meaning from text for youth of all ages.

(2) Information and knowledge. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners teach multiple strategies to locate, analyze, evaluate, and ethically use information in the context of inquiry-based learning.
  • Practitioners advocate for flexible and open access to library resources, both physical and virtual.
  • Practitioners uphold and promote the legal and ethical codes of their profession, including privacy, confidentiality, freedom and equity of access to information.
  • Practitioners use skills and knowledge to assess reference sources, services, and tools in order to mediate between information needs and resources to assist learners in determining what they need.
  • Practitioners model and facilitate authentic learning with current and emerging digital tools for locating, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information resources to support research, learning, creating, and communicating in a digital society.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of creative and innovative uses of technologies to engage students and facilitate higher-level thinking.
  • Practitioners develop an articulated information literacy curriculum grounded in research related to the information search process.
  • Practitioners understand the process of collecting, interpreting, and using data to develop new knowledge to improve the school library program.
  • Practitioners employ the methods of research in library and information science.

(3) Program administration and leadership. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners evaluate and select print, non-print, and digital resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop and manage a quality collection designed to meet the diverse curricular, personal, and professional needs of the educational community.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge necessary to organize the library collections according to current standard library cataloging and classification principles.
  • Practitioners develop policies and procedures to support ethical use of information, intellectual freedom, selection and reconsideration of library materials, and the privacy of users of all ages.
  • Practitioners develop strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational program.
  • Practitioners demonstrate knowledge of best practices related to planning, budgeting (including alternative funding), organizing, and evaluating human and information resources and facilities to ensure equitable access.
  • Practitioners understand strategic planning to ensure that the school library program addresses the needs of diverse communities.
  • Practitioners advocate for school library and information programs, resources, and services among stakeholders.
  • Practitioners promote initiatives and partnerships to further the mission and goals of the school library program.

(4) Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

  • Practitioners apply knowledge of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and cultural influences of learning at the elementary and secondary levels.
  • Practitioners implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute to an active, inquiry-based approach to learning in a digital environment at the elementary and secondary levels.
  • Practitioners understand the teacher librarian role in curriculum development and the school improvement process at the elementary and secondary levels.
  • Practitioners collaborate to integrate information literacy and emerging technologies into content area curricula.
    Checklist

100 ---Teacher--Prekindergarten through grade three, including special education.

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to teach children from birth through grade three.

b. Program requirements.

(1) Degree--baccalaureate.

(2) Completion of an approved human relations program.

(3) Completion of the professional education core.

c. Content.

(NOTE: Because of the nature of the requirements for this endorsement, applicants must complete the teacher preparation institution’s approved program. There is no avenue available for adding this endorsement through the completing of state minimum standards.)

(1) Child growth and development.

1.Understand the nature of child growth and development for infants and toddlers (birth through age 2), preprimary (age 3 through age 5) and primary school children (age 6 through age 8), both typical and atypical, in areas of cognition, language development, physical motor, social-emotional, aesthetics, and adaptive behavior.

2.Understand individual differences in development and learning including risk factors, developmental variations and developmental patterns of specific disabilities and special abilities.

3.Recognize that children are best understood in the contexts of family, culture and society and that cultural and linguistic diversity influences development and learning.

(2) Developmentally appropriate learning environment and curriculum implementation.

1.Establish learning environments with social support, from the teacher and from other students, for all children to meet their optimal potential, with a climate characterized by mutual respect, encouraging and valuing the efforts of all regardless of proficiency.

2.Appropriately use informal and formal assessment to monitor development of children and to plan and evaluate curriculum and teaching practices to meet individual needs of children and families.

3.Plan, implement, and continuously evaluate developmentally and individually appropriate curriculum goals, content, and teaching practices for infants, toddlers, preprimary and primary children based on the needs and interests of individual children, their families and community.

4.Use both child-initiated and teacher-directed instructional methods, including strategies such as small and large group projects, unstructured and structured play, systematic instruction, group discussion and cooperative decision making.

5.Develop and implement integrated learning experiences for home-, center- and school-based environments for infants, toddlers, preprimary and primary children:

·Develop and implement integrated learning experiences that facilitate cognition, communication, social and physical development of infants and toddlers within the context of parent-child and caregiver-child relationships.

·Develop and implement learning experiences for preprimary and primary children with focus on multicultural and nonsexist content that includes development of responsibility, aesthetic and artistic development, physical development and well-being, cognitive development, and emotional and social development.

·Develop and implement learning experiences for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary children with a focus on language, mathematics, science, social studies, visual and expressive arts, social skills, higher-thinking skills, and developmentally appropriate methodology.

·Develop adaptations and accommodations for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary aged children to meet their individual needs.

6.Adapt materials, equipment, the environment, programs and use of human resources to meet social, cognitive, physical motor, communication, and medical needs of children and diverse learning needs.

(3) Health, safety and nutrition.

1.Design and implement physically and psychologically safe and healthy indoor and outdoor environments to promote development and learning.

2.Promote nutritional practices that support cognitive, social, cultural and physical development of young children.

3.Implement appropriate appraisal and management of health concerns of young children including procedures for children with special health care needs.

4.Recognize signs of emotional distress, physical and mental abuse and neglect in young children and understand mandatory reporting procedures.

5.Demonstrate proficiency in infant-child cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergency procedures and first aid.

(4) Family and community collaboration.

1.Apply theories and knowledge of dynamic roles and relationships within and between families, schools, and communities.

2.Assist families in identifying resources, priorities, and concerns in relation to the child's development.

3.Link families, based on identified needs, priorities and concerns, with a variety of resources.

4.Use communication, problem-solving and help-giving skills in collaboration with families and other professionals to support the development, learning and well-being of young children.

5.Participate as an effective member of a team with other professionals and families to develop and implement learning plans and environments for young children.

(5) Professionalism.

1.Understand legislation and public policy that affect all young children, with and without disabilities, and their families.

2.Understand legal aspects, historical, philosophical, and social foundations of early childhood education and special education.

3.Understand principles of administration, organization and operation of programs for children aged birth to 8 and their families, including staff and program development, supervision and evaluation of staff, and continuing improvement of programs and services.

4.Identify current trends and issues of the profession to inform and improve practices and advocate for quality programs for young children and their families.

5.Adhere to professional and ethical codes.

6.Engage in reflective inquiry and demonstration of professional self-knowledge.

(6) Prestudent teaching field experiences. Complete 100 clock hours of prestudent teaching field experience with three age levels in infant and toddler, preprimary and primary programs and in different settings, such as rural and urban, encompassing differing socio-economic status, ability levels, cultural and linguistic diversity and program types and sponsorship.

(7) Student teaching. Complete a supervised student teaching experience of at least 12 weeks total in at least two different settings in two of three age levels: infant and toddler, preprimary, primary and with children with and without disabilities.

Vocational Endorsements

The following endorsements (300-307) first require the completion of a teacher education program

300 Agricultural sciences and agribusiness. Completion of 24 semester hours in agricultural business management or economics, agricultural mechanics, agronomy, animal science, and horticulture. One thousand hours of work experience in one or more agriculture related occupations. Coursework in agriculture education to include foundations of vocational and career education, planning and implementing courses and curriculum, methods and techniques of instruction, evaluation of programs and students, and in the coordination of cooperative experience education programs.
Checklist

301 Marketing/distributive education. Completion of 24 semester hours in business to include a minimum of 6 semester hours each in marketing, management, and economics. Three thousand hours of recent, relevant work experience in occupations where the distribution of goods and services was the prime function. Coursework in foundations of vocational and career education, in curriculum design oriented to marketing, and in the coordination of cooperative education programs.
Checklist

302 Office education. Completion of 24 semester hours in business to include coursework in office management, business communications, word and data processing and computer applications in business. Three thousand hours of recent, relevant work experience in an office related occupation. Coursework in foundations of vocational and career education, in curriculum design oriented to office education, and in the coordination of cooperative education programs.
Checklist

303 Consumer and homemaking education. Completion of 24 semester hours in food and nutrition, consumer education, family living and parenthood education, child development, housing, home and resource management, and clothing and textiles. Four hundred hours of work experience in one or more homemaking or consumer related occupations. Coursework in consumer and homemaking education to include methods and techniques of instruction, foundations of vocational and career education, course and curriculum development, and evaluation of programs and students.
Checklist

304 Occupational Family and Consumer Science.
1. Option 1. Completion of the requirements for consumer and homemaking education (see 16.1(4)) and special preparation in the occupational area or 400 hours of employment related specifically to the occupational area.
2. Option 2. Completion of a baccalaureate degree with a major in the occupational area, coursework in methods and techniques of teaching, course and curriculum development, evaluation of programs and students, foundations of vocational and career education, coordination of cooperative programs and a teaching practicum (supervised or assessment of other teaching experience), 400 hours of employment related specifically to the occupational area.
Checklist

305 Multioccupations. Completion of any 5-12 endorsement, and in addition thereto, coursework in foundations of vocational and career education, coordination of cooperative programs and competency based curriculum development. Four thousand hours of occupational experience in two or more occupations. The multioccupations endorsement also authorizes the holder to supervise students in cooperative programs, school to work programs, and similar programs in which the student is placed in school sponsored, on the job situations.
Checklist
Experience Verification Form

306 Health occupations. Four thousand hours of occupational experience within five years preceding application for licensure in the occupation to be taught. Program completion leading to registration, certification, or licensure in Iowa in the health specialty to be taught. Coursework in foundations of vocational and career education, planning and implementing courses and curriculum, methods and techniques of instruction, and evaluation of programs and pupils.
Checklist

307 Trade and industrial subjects. Demonstrated occupational competence in an industrial, trade, or technical field by completion of a minimum of 4,000 hours of practical, hands on experience in the area in which the endorsement is sought or written examination. Coursework in foundations of vocational and career education, planning and implementing courses and curriculum, methods and techniques of instruction, and evaluation of programs and pupils.
Checklist

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